Coastal Conservation Network is organized to conserve coastal ecosystems and improve coastal resiliency through collaboration, technology, outreach, education, and advocacy.

Recent Work

New posts from Coastal Conservation Network and new coastal conservation videos from our friends and affiliates.

Responding to Risks of Marine Debris: Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris

Responding to Risks of Marine Debris: Japanese...

The Research on Antarctic Glacial Melting

Independent videographer Peter Sinclair’s...

EPA Clean Power Plan Explained

EPA Clean Power Plan...

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy announces Clean Power Plan Proposal

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy announces Clean...

Open Martin’s Beach: Basis for Surfrider Foundation Coastal Act Lawsuit

Open Martin’s Beach: Basis for Surfrider...

CAP: The Economic Case for Restoring Coastal Ecosystems

By Michael Conathan, Jeffrey Buchanan, and Shiva...

More About Our Company

Coastal Conservation Network is organized to protect our coastal communities and conserve our natural and scenic seashores for clean water, coastal habitat, and safe recreation. We work for sensible strengthening of coastal protections for our communities and for our livelihoods.

 

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Recent Blog Posts

April 10, 2014 |

CAP: The Economic Case for Restoring Coastal Ecosystems

By Michael Conathan, Jeffrey Buchanan, and Shiva Polefka Originally published by Center for American Progress April 9, 2014 As America’s coastal cities expanded throughout the 19th century, the wetlands were often considered a nuisance that stood in the way of progress and development. Marshy areas seemed little more than endless founts of pesky insects or quagmires blocking access between drier uplands and navigable waters. As cities outgrew their dry land footprints and sought additional space to grow, the obvious answer was to simply turn the wet places into dry places. Today, these regions—from Boston’s Back Bay to New York’s Wall Street to Miami’s South Beach—comprise some of the most valuable real estate in the world. We...

October 21, 2013 |

Center for American Progress: Five Assignments for the Task Force on Climate Preparedness

By Daniel J. Weiss | Originally published October 21, 2013 The Fifth Assessment Report of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, released September 27, cautioned that the effects of climate change will continue to worsen due to existing and projected atmospheric levels of carbon and other climate pollutants. IPCC Co-Chair Thomas Stocker warned that “heat waves are very likely to occur more frequently and last longer. As the Earth warms, we expect to see currently wet regions receiving more rainfall, and dry regions receiving less.” This growing threat of extreme weather heightens the urgency to increase U.S. communities’ resilience to future extreme weather events. Fortunately, President Barack Obama’s Climate Action Plan includes the first-ever community resilience program,...

September 25, 2013 |

Gov. Christie Moves Against Dune Construction Holdouts

Gov. Chris Christie’s frustration with beachfront landowners refusing to grant easements for dune reconstruction after Sandy has come to its logical conclusion. The Governor signed an executive order today authorizing legal action against holdouts so that protective dunes can be rebuilt. In a statement, Gov. Christie said, “As we rebuild from Superstorm Sandy, we need to make sure we are stronger, more resilient and prepared for future storms, and dunes are a major component of this process. We can no longer be held back from completing these critical projects by a small number of owners who are selfishly concerned about their view while putting large swaths of homes and businesses around them at risk.’ Not...

September 19, 2013 |

Virginia Mayors: Respond to Climate Change

By Bill Kovarik Republished from The Daily Climate under Creative Commons License. “The fact of the matter is, we’ve got rising waters…. Somebody has got to deal with it.”– State Sen. John Watkins, R-Richmond “Someone has to own this issue… The water is coming.” – Mayor Paul Fraim, Norfolk WILLIAMSBURG, Va. – Weary of debating the causes of climate change, mayors and other elected officials from Virginia’s battered coastal regions gathered here last week and agreed that local impacts have become serious enough to present a case for state action. “We are here to ask for your assistance,” said Norfolk Mayor Paul Fraim. “It’s a threat we can no longer afford to ignore.” So far, assistance from the...

September 18, 2013 |

Sea Level Rise: The Infographic

Via Union of Concerned Scientists....

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