CAP: The Economic Case for Restoring Coastal Ecosystems

CAP: The Economic Case for Restoring Coastal Ecosystems

By Michael Conathan, Jeffrey Buchanan, and Shiva Polefka Originally published by Center for American Progress April 9, 2014 As America’s coastal cities expanded throughout the 19th century, the wetlands were often considered a nuisance that stood in the way of progress and development. Marshy areas seemed little more than endless founts of pesky insects or quagmires blocking access between drier uplands and navigable waters. As cities outgrew...

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Center for American Progress: Five Assignments for the Task Force on Climate Preparedness

Center for American Progress: Five Assignments for the Task Force on Climate Preparedness

By Daniel J. Weiss | Originally published October 21, 2013 The Fifth Assessment Report of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, released September 27, cautioned that the effects of climate change will continue to worsen due to existing and projected atmospheric levels of carbon and other climate pollutants. IPCC Co-Chair Thomas Stocker warned that “heat waves are very likely to occur more frequently and last longer. As...

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Gov. Christie Moves Against Dune Construction Holdouts

Gov. Christie Moves Against Dune Construction Holdouts

Gov. Chris Christie’s frustration with beachfront landowners refusing to grant easements for dune reconstruction after Sandy has come to its logical conclusion. The Governor signed an executive order today authorizing legal action against holdouts so that protective dunes can be rebuilt. In a statement, Gov. Christie said, “As we rebuild from Superstorm Sandy, we need to make sure we are stronger, more resilient and prepared for...

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Virginia Mayors: Respond to Climate Change

Virginia Mayors: Respond to Climate Change

By Bill Kovarik Republished from The Daily Climate under Creative Commons License. “The fact of the matter is, we’ve got rising waters…. Somebody has got to deal with it.”– State Sen. John Watkins, R-Richmond “Someone has to own this issue… The water is coming.” – Mayor Paul Fraim, Norfolk WILLIAMSBURG, Va. – Weary of debating the causes of climate change, mayors and other elected officials...

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The Public’s Property Rights in Drakes Bay

The Public’s Property Rights in Drakes Bay

There’s a risk, when coming late to an issue that’s been festering for years, that we might miss some of the nuance that make the issue so intractably difficult. But we’re finding that the Drake’s Bay Oyster Co. dispute is much clearer without any extra local-colorful details. When the 9th Circuit denied an injunction this week, it seemed to us to be the most obvious result to the most simple of problems. At it’s...

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NASA: Summer Arctic Sea Ice Retreat 2013

NASA: Summer Arctic Sea Ice Retreat 2013

Summer Arctic Sea Ice Retreat: May – August 2013 From NASA: “The melting of sea ice in the Arctic is well on its way toward its annual “minimum,” that time when the floating ice cap covers less of the Arctic Ocean than at any other period during the year. 2013’s melt rates are in line with the sustained decline of the Arctic ice cover observed by NASA and other satellites over the last several decades. In this...

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Coastal Resilience Easement Used In Maryland to Protect National Historic Monument Site

Coastal Resilience Easement Used In Maryland to Protect National Historic Monument Site

In what the State of Maryland is touting as the first of its kind, a new, 221-acre “coastal resilience easement” has been acquired to protect the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park and Scenic Byway on Maryland’s eastern shore. In an announcement, Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley said, “Because of our State’s vulnerability to sea level rise — especially in our coastal communities —...

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New Orleans Reconstruction Depends on Coastal Restoration

New Orleans Reconstruction Depends on Coastal Restoration

According to a recent progress report, the New Orleans of today is perhaps better off than the New Orleans before Katrina. There’s economic and entrepreneurial growth, renewed parks and recreation infrastructure and opportunities, and vibrant-as-ever arts and cultural communities. By many measures, the reconstruction is coming along nicely. However, as the report puts it, “Creating a new New Orleans will mean little if it cannot be...

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